Skip to main content

Newsroom

Select Category- Any -In the NewsNews

Larry Downes: "The Right and Wrong Ways to Regulate Self-Driving Cars" (HBR)
Self-driving, autonomous vehicles — a topic of speculation, if not science fiction, just five years ago — are suddenly going mainstream. Before long, we’ll stop referring to the underlying...
Washington Post Logo
Larry Downes: "Why you may have good reason to worry about all those smart devices" (Washington Post)
There are an estimated 1.5 trillion objects around the world that could one day connect to the Internet, everything from simple housewares to automobiles. In the so-called Internet of Things, each of...
Hahn releases paper: "The Behavioralist as Policy Designer: The Need to Test Multiple Treatments to Meet Multiple Targets"
Anna-Maria Kovacs: "Free can be good and is hardly anti-competitive" (East Bay Times)
Deals, especially deals built around free, are offered for all conceivable goods and services. For some shoppers, finding the best deals is a sport. For others, deals provide a way to afford luxuries...
Anna-Maria Kovacs: "Investing in America’s communications infrastructure" (The Hill)
President-elect Trump has promised to lower taxes and strengthen America’s infrastructure. To fulfill that dual commitment, private investment is essential. It is particularly crucial for the...
Catherine Tinsley: "What Would Hillary's Win Signify for Women?" (Huffington Post)
Over the past few weeks, I have heard the same question over and over: what will it mean for women if Hillary Clinton is elected? To me, the question isn’t, “what do the election results mean?” but “...
J. Bradford Jensen quoted in TheStreet article: "The 5 Reasons Economists Love Trade"
On the face of it, the numbers look grim. We have a $40 billion foreign trade gap (the difference between the mutual values of a country's imports and exports). Manufacturing jobs have crumbled...
Washington Post Logo
Larry Downes: "Google and Facebook contribute zero economic value. That’s a big problem for trade." (Washington Post)
How much value do free online services contribute to the U.S. economy? Ask any user of Google, Facebook, YouTube or Twitter, and the answer would most likely be, “A lot.” But according to every...
Larry Downes: "U.S. Digital Infrastructure Needs More Private Investment" (HBR)
There’s an urgent need to invest in America’s crumbling infrastructure. Even our politicians agree on that. As anyone who has driven a car, ridden a train, turned on the tap, or lost power during a...
Washington Post Logo
Larry Downes: "A new digital divide has emerged — and conventional solutions won’t bridge the gap" (Washington Post)
Though the United States has made profound progress in making Internet access universally available, a new digital divide has emerged that defies conventional solutions. Since both Hillary Clinton...
Kovacs releases policy paper: "Business Data Services: The Potential Harm to Competitive Facilities Deployment"
Hahn releases paper: “Using Big Data to Estimate Consumer Surplus: The Case of Uber”
Jensen, Quinn, and Weymouth issue policy paper: “Winners and Losers in International Trade: Effects on U.S. Presidential Voting"

Senior Policy Scholar J. Bradford Jensen and Faculty Affiliates Dennis Quinn and Stephen Weymouth recently issued a paper, “...

Scott Wallsten
Scott Wallsten named President of the Technology Policy Institute

Senior Policy Scholar Scott Wallsten was named President of the Technology Policy Institute, effective September 1, 2016. Scott formerly served as the Institute's Vice President for Research and...

Huffington Post logo
Catherine Tinsley: "Women & Girls in Sports: When will we accept the new normal?" (Huffington Post)
Why do our cultural images lag? And what effect might this have on our girls? They return from their games sweaty, proud, and fueled with strength only to be bombarded with images contradicting what...
Washington Post Logo
Larry Downes: "Why treating the Internet as a public utility is bad for consumers" (Washington Post)
Open Internet advocates celebrated long and loud in June when a federal court upheld the Federal Communications Commission’s “net neutrality” rules that prohibit broadband-access providers from...

Pages