What's New

Downes wishes Moore’s law a happy 50th birthday in the Washington Post

Larry Downes’ latest piece for the Washington Post Innovations page is on Moore’s Law, or “Gordon Moore[‘s] … famous prediction that, for the foreseeable future, the number of components on semiconductors or ‘chips’ would continue to double every twelve to eighteen months even as the cost per chip would hold constant.” “Happy Birthday to Moore’s […]

Downes in CNET: “Will California regulators overstep on the Comcast-Time Warner Cable merger?”

On April 13, CNET released Larry Downes’ “Will California regulators overstep on the Comcast-Time Warner Cable merger?” To approve the merger it must pass muster by both state and federal regulators. In California it is caught up in the state’s Public Utilities Commission, despite: Many of the proposed conditions have utterly no relation to mitigating […]

McDonough hosts Daschle, distingished guests to discuss cybersecurity

April 9, 2015 – The McDonough School of Business today presents the first Rafik Hariri Symposium,“Conducting Business in an Unsafe World: ISIL, Cybersecurity, and Militarism.” Featured panelists include, the Honorable Tom Daschle, former majority leader of the U.S. Senate, the Honorable Robert Mosbacher, Jr., chairman of Mosbacher Energy Company and past president and CEO of […]

Downes, in Forbes: “On Net Neutrality, Six Ways The FCC’s Public Utility Order Will Lose In Court”

On April 8 the Larry Downes released “On Net Neutrality, Six Ways The FCC’s Public Utility Order Will Lose In Court” in Forbes. The long-form piece is the result of Downes’ careful reading of the 300 page report and thousands of footnotes. Finding more than a dozen points that could be the basis of legal action, […]

Downes in Forbes: “How Philips Thrived In Lighting’s ‘Big Crunch'”

Larry Downes and Big Bang Disruption co-author Paul Nunes have a piece in Forbes discussing how the Dutch conglomerate Philips has successfully navigated big bang disruptions in the lighting business: Philips demonstrates how incumbents can use their assets to win in the phase we refer to as “the Big Crunch”—the relatively sudden decline of seemingly […]

More News

Generating Ideas

Convening Leaders

Shaping Policy

             
About the photograph:
 
The photograph shows one of two statues outside the Federal Trade Commission building in Washington, D.C.  The statue symbolizes the Federal Trade Commission (the straining man) in its attempt to control the enormity of trade (the horse).  Each statue is approximately 12 feet high and 15 feet long.  They are sculpted from Indiana limestone.
See More